Monthly Archives: October 2013

Registration Now Open for 2014 NAA Education Conference & Exposition

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to “Reach New Heights” as more than 6,600 multifamily professionals convene in Denver June 18-21 for the 2014 NAA Education Conference & Exposition.

From world-famous speakers to the latest and greatest from multifamily supplier partners, if career enhancement is what you seek, then this is the one event you can’t afford to miss. Don’t delay—the largest discounts go to those who register early.

And, make sure to book your housing as soon as you register—rooms will go fast and you will be unable to book without first registering. Visit the Education Conference website for information and reservations for all official NAA Education Conference hotels.

Water Rates Poised to Rise Further as Utility Debt Grows

Water rates, which for some U.S. customers have more than doubled since 2000, are probably going to increase in the short term as companies struggle with rising debt and the need to spend on infrastructure, according to a Columbia University report.

Utility debt increased on average 33 percent from 2000 to 2010, while water rates rose 23 percent, a report by Columbia’s Water Center concluded. For a third of the more than 1,000 utilities surveyed by the American Water Works Association, debt and rates gained more than 100 percent in the time period.

“The problem of escalating debt and rising rates is not a problem limited to a handful of poorly managed utilities, but includes many well-run utilities,” Ed Pinero, head of sustainability for North America at Veolia Environnement SA (VIE), said in a statement today. “Many of today’s water managers are operating in an old framework that needs to be re-examined for the 21st century.”

Water infrastructure in the U.S. needs at least $1 trillion in investment to repair and replace systems, according to a report released in March by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The group gave U.S water infrastructure a barely passing D grade, citing almost 240,000 water main breaks annually and an average reservoir age of 52 years.

The report suggests companies should improve operational efficiency, focus on environmentally sustainable water sources and explore alternative rate structures.

Veolia Environnement, Europe’s largest water company, is one of several companies and organizations that fund the Water Center.

By Peter Ward – October 14, 2013

Bloomberg

Why Degree Days Matter

When Electric Bills Give You the Third Degree
The Scene: Your financials were just distributed. Ten minutes later your email box is blowing up with ALL CAPS emails asking why your electricity expense is 23% higher than what was
budgeted. You look at the bills and the rate is the same but the usage is excessively high
compared to last year and the year before. What happened?

Unless you’re allowing a department store to hook up to your power line, it is likely due to a
change in the weather. Sounds like a good explanation but how do you explain that to your
supervisor or deliver that message to an owner that has unmistakable credibility?  Understanding the impact of degree days is critical.

Explaining Degree Days: Degree days is a measurement that explains the difference between
the average daily mean temperature and what it will take to heat or cool a building or facility to meet the desired building point temperature (BPT).

For example, if the average outside temperature per day is 59 degrees Fahrenheit for a month and your BPT is 65 degrees, than the heating degree days (HDD) = 65-59 X the number of days in a month or period of heating degree days.

Heating degree season begins:  July 1
Cooling degree day season begins:  January 1

65F-59F= 6 HDD x 31 days in the period = 186 HDD in the period

Consequently, if last year the average temperature was 62 degrees for the same period, the
number of heating degree days was less:

65F-62F= 3 x 31 days in the period = 93 HDD in the period

Or, a 50% increase in HDD year over year for the same period.

The same concept applies for cooling degree days (CDD). If the average temperature is above
65F then there will be additional cooling degree days.

75F – 65F = 10 x 31 days in the period = 310 CDD in the period

The prior year, same period;

70F – 65F = 5 x 31 in the period = 155 CDD in the prior year

Or, a 50% increase in CDD year over year for the same period.

For the full article, click here: http://www.minolusa.com/pdf/Why-Degree-Days-Matter.pdf