Tag Archives: multifamily electric conservation

Six Ways to Save Energy and Money This Winter

For most of the country, winter means several months of chilly temperatures, hot bowls of soup, and snowflakes in the air. But it doesn’t have to mean costly utility bills. Whether you’re concerned about your monthly payment or your environmental impact, there are a few simple steps you can take to save electricity in your apartment this winter.

  1. Wrap your windows. As a renter, you can’t install storm windows or replace older, drafty single-pane windows. But you can still seal out the cold. Use heat-shrink plastic wrap, sold in kits for varying window sizes, that trap a layer of insulating air to block out wintry winds. It might not be the most stylish solution, but, if you live in an area with blustery winters, these kits can save you up to $20 per window throughout the heating season.
  2. Turn down the heat. You rarely spend all day inside your apartment, so why should you spend all day paying to heat it? Before you leave for work or school, turn down your thermostat a few degrees. Lowering the temperature while you’re away can lower your heating bill by about 10%, according to Energy.gov. But don’t keep your apartment too cold: To prevent pipes from freezing, you should heat your apartment to at least 50 degrees — warmer if you have pets.
  3. Open the curtains. If you have south-facing windows, where the sun spends its time in the winter sky, open those curtains let the sun stream in. Although you probably spent most of the summer trying to keep the sun from turning your apartment into an oven, now is the time to take full advantage of the sun’s warm rays.
  4. Use your ceiling fan. During the summer, your ceiling fan should be spinning counterclockwise to push down a cooling breeze. During winter, reverse the direction so that your fan is pushing air up. Keep it on a low-speed, and the fan will  circulate heat more efficiently and keep your home warmer.
  5. Bust out the blankets. Keeping your apartment at a cooler temperature while you’re away has its benefits, but if you also keep them a few degrees lower while you’re home, your savings will be even greater. Energy.gov estimates that you can save about 1% of your heating bill for every degree you lower your thermostat, so bundle up with sweatshirts and blankets instead of cranking the heat up to 75 degrees.
  6. Block drafts. Is there ice building up on the inside of your window? Turn the lock. Locking your windows in the winter time creates a seal that blocks out winter winds and prevents this buildup. Also, many apartments have a locked closet that holds their HVAC unit, which vents outside and, unfortunately, lets cold air into your apartment. Use a door snake or a tightly wrapped towel to block the draft and keep your warm air inside.

Saving energy in the winter isn’t just a homeowners game. Your pocketbook (or your property manager’s) can still reap the benefits of a few thoughtful tweaks around your apartment.

Originally published by ABODO

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Why Degree Days Matter

When Electric Bills Give You the Third Degree
The Scene: Your financials were just distributed. Ten minutes later your email box is blowing up with ALL CAPS emails asking why your electricity expense is 23% higher than what was
budgeted. You look at the bills and the rate is the same but the usage is excessively high
compared to last year and the year before. What happened?

Unless you’re allowing a department store to hook up to your power line, it is likely due to a
change in the weather. Sounds like a good explanation but how do you explain that to your
supervisor or deliver that message to an owner that has unmistakable credibility?  Understanding the impact of degree days is critical.

Explaining Degree Days: Degree days is a measurement that explains the difference between
the average daily mean temperature and what it will take to heat or cool a building or facility to meet the desired building point temperature (BPT).

For example, if the average outside temperature per day is 59 degrees Fahrenheit for a month and your BPT is 65 degrees, than the heating degree days (HDD) = 65-59 X the number of days in a month or period of heating degree days.

Heating degree season begins:  July 1
Cooling degree day season begins:  January 1

65F-59F= 6 HDD x 31 days in the period = 186 HDD in the period

Consequently, if last year the average temperature was 62 degrees for the same period, the
number of heating degree days was less:

65F-62F= 3 x 31 days in the period = 93 HDD in the period

Or, a 50% increase in HDD year over year for the same period.

The same concept applies for cooling degree days (CDD). If the average temperature is above
65F then there will be additional cooling degree days.

75F – 65F = 10 x 31 days in the period = 310 CDD in the period

The prior year, same period;

70F – 65F = 5 x 31 in the period = 155 CDD in the prior year

Or, a 50% increase in CDD year over year for the same period.

For the full article, click here: http://www.minolusa.com/pdf/Why-Degree-Days-Matter.pdf